Daily Life in Imperial Russia

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Get In-Stock Alert. Delivery not available. Pickup not available. Gifting note: Ships in the manufacturer's original packaging, which may reveal the contents. This volume traces the majesty and scandals of imperial Russia, from Peter the Great to the Bolshevik Revolution.

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22 VINTAGE PHOTOS CAPTURE DAILY LIFE OF THE LAST TSAR OF RUSSIA, NICHOLAS II IN THE 1910S

Write a review. See any care plans, options and policies that may be associated with this product. Email address. Please enter a valid email address. Walmart Services. Such strict rules were difficult to uphold with the realities of everyday life in the 19th century. In the beginning of the 20th century peasant women could boast the most freedom in this matter.

They mostly lived in villages where the need for personal documentation was not so important.

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Yet, the process of modernisation prompted many women to move to bigger cities to become working women and passport limitations were significantly loosened for this category of women. Women living in cities also had it easier to obtain a passport. Things would complicate years later when the fictitious spouses would decide to create their own families. Divorces were allowed, but bureaucratic procedures took a long time and were difficult to process.

Unlike European civil codes Russian law did not mention anything about spouses living separately. Nonetheless, it was quite common for spouses to be officially married but not living together in 19th century Russia. However, everything was much easier than getting a divorce. The divorce process largely depended on confessional affiliation in the Russian Empire. Russian civil law did contain divorce rules for Orthodox Christians or mixed-faith marriages where one of the spouses belonged to the Orthodox Church.

After a petition was sent to the ecclesiastical court, the consistory begins the investigation process.

The ecclesiastical court gathered evidence itself and, at the same time, tried to dissuade the spouses from divorce. This court process, in its nature, was like any other. Any decision ruled by the consistory could be overruled by higher Orthodox Church authorities.

The process would be nonetheless long and difficult and in case of adultery, also humiliating. The number of divorces only grew by the end of the 19th century. Due to the difficulties of getting a divorce, many couples reached an agreement to simply live apart, while remaining officially married. According to official demographic statistics of St Petersburg, there were 0. All in all, the above list of issues faced by women in the final years of the Russian empire shows that, despite some peculiarities, many of the rights were evolving in a similar fashion as in Western Europe.

In the last years of the existence of the Russian empire, there was a big leap and a legal change thanks to the activities of the feminist movement, which were under the influence of the First World War and the February revolution. In women of the Great Princedom of Finland, first in Europe, got voting rights and could elect members to the parliament.

In February there was a law which gave the women of the Russian empire the right to hold a passport, the divorce procedure got simplified, and the status of illegitimate children was abolished. On April 15th women of the Russian Empire also got their voting rights to city dumas while on June 20th they got them to the Constituent Assembly. Therefore, the Bolsheviks inherited very progressive legislation in regards to women rights. Imperial russia , Russia , Women's rights. The Black Sea region is quickly becoming a geopolitical battleground which is gaining the interest of major powers, regional players and smaller countries — and the stakes are only getting higher.

This issue takes a special look at the role and responsibility of the public intellectual in Central and Eastern Europe today. In the eastern parts of the European continent, is remembered not only as the end of the First World War, but also saw the emergence of newly-independent states and the rise of geopolitical struggles which are felt until this day.

It often seems, at least from the outside, that Belarus remains isolated from the West and very static in its transformation. Yet, despite its relative isolation, Belarus is indeed changing. The Summer issue of New Eastern Europe tackles the complexity of para-states in the post-Soviet space. Vladimir Putin is set to win a fourth term as president of the Russian Federation. The first issue of looks at the rise of a new generation in the post-Soivet space — one that may be radically different than previous Soviet and immediate post-Soviet generations.

Central Asia is an ethnically, geographically and culturally diverse region, covering a similar land mass as the European Union. Yet, it remains one of the least familiar to the general public in the West.

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We cannot deny there is something idiosyncratic about the former Soviet bloc which links its societies together. Either through common experience or history or both. Outcasts of history The thaw of the s allowed Russian historians to become re-acquainted with the pre-revolutionary and non-Marxist methods of interpreting historical events.

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Issue 5 The Black Sea region The Black Sea region is quickly becoming a geopolitical battleground which is gaining the interest of major powers, regional players and smaller countries — and the stakes are only getting higher. Subscribe to NEE.

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Issue 2 Postmodern Geopolitics The consequences of the emerging multipolar world. Issue 1 Public intellecturals This issue takes a special look at the role and responsibility of the public intellectual in Central and Eastern Europe today.


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The year of independence In the eastern parts of the European continent, is remembered not only as the end of the First World War, but also saw the emergence of newly-independent states and the rise of geopolitical struggles which are felt until this day. Life beyond geopolitics The Summer issue of New Eastern Europe tackles the complexity of para-states in the post-Soviet space.

Issue 6 Central Asia. The forgotten region? Issue 5 Homo Post-Sovieticus We cannot deny there is something idiosyncratic about the former Soviet bloc which links its societies together. Issue 2 Is the world turning upside down? Rarely did she stray from the gendered scripts— in striking contrast to those exceptional Russian noblewomen who rebelled by pursuing higher education in universities or by joining a revolutionary movement.

Despite being thoroughly integrated into Russian elite society, Poliakova remained a Jewish woman, subject to the confessional laws of the empire and religious laws that governed her household. Her mother kept a strict kosher home, refusing to violate any dietary laws for the sake of their social life. For all the harsh criticisms of her mother's fanaticism, Poliakova kept a bitter record of how carefully she observed the laws: "Today, we drank black coffee with sugar instead of cream.

A unique insight into Jewish life in Imperial Russia

It was not very delicious, but then everything has to be done according to what is written in the laws of Moses. The construction of gender in Jewish society implied sexuality, and any departures from gender norms were considered deviations and disciplined. As in most societies, Jewish women bore the brunt of social stigma for the violation of their chastity. For instance, in Rakhil Krupen, a cook in the home of a Girsh Kolodnyi of Moscow, accused her employer of violently raping her and firing her when she became pregnant to "hide his vile behavior. Other witnesses also testified that the cook "behaved like a streetwalker.

However, the witnesses clearly assumed that, given Krupen's immodest reputation, she could not have been raped and was solely responsible for her pregnancy. The double standard was most evident in a denunciation to the Medical Administration of Vilna by a certain A.

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